Kathy’s Quiz: no 5

Every week during the Lockdown, W Yorks HPS member Kathy Howard will produce a horticultural quiz to keep our minds fresh. The answers (no cheating please!) will be published alongside the following week’s quiz questions.

For answers to Quiz 4, click here

This week, the challenge is to match the plant with an extract from the RHS description. All are plants we expect be in flower in Spring

The Plants

a. Ceanothus

b. Heuchera

c. Daphne

d. Hyacinthoides

e. Geum

f. Darmera

g. Polygonatum

h. Aquilegia

i. Astrantia

j. Allium

The descriptions

1.  “compact umbels of tiny flowers surrounded by a rosette of showy bracts

2. “glossy, elliptic leaves and pendant, tubular or bell-shaped flowers”   

3. “bell-shaped flowers with spreading, coloured sepals and petals with spurs

4. “pinnately lobed leaves and saucer-shaped flowers in loose clusters

5. “linear to strap-shaped leaves and bell-shaped or star-shaped blue, violet or white flowers”

6. “star-shaped or bell-shaped flowers in an umbel on a leafless stem”

7. “small blue, pink or white flowers in profuse axillary or terminal clusters”  

8. “rounded clusters of star-shaped white or pink flowers on tall stems, before the leaves

9. “with small, usually very fragrant tubular, 4-lobed flowers”

10. “clump-forming perennials with attractive, rounded, shallowly palmately lobed leaves

Lockdown Gallery – week 6

April 27 to May 3rd

Weather: The last week of April is much cooler, with occasional rain, but still some sunshine to be enjoyed.

Ann Fritchley weighs in with an excellent selection

Maggie Sugden is back with the first rose of summer!

Here’s Maggie Youdan with a varied selection of beauties

Terry Benton is back – not sure I can cope with snails, even little ones..

Pat Hunter offers a superb Erythronium picture

Erythronium ‘Joanna’

Joyce Kenny is keen to enjoy her hostas before any molluscs do

Kate van Heel has been looking at Anemones this week

Here are the new arrivals in the Hackett’s garden this week

Another interesting contribution from Judith Ladley, including a welcome return for that handsome Hebe hulkeana:

A first appearance in the Lockdown Gallery for Denise Dyson (and that Hebe is back…)

Preston Harrison returns to the gallery with a cracking selection

Beth Chatto: A Life with Plants

by Catherine Horwood

A personal review by Judith Ladley

The main garden – picture from the HPS holiday 2016

On looking through the April edition of the RHS magazine recently I noticed two book reviews by Fergus Garrett which looked particularly interesting.  The first was a book about Jimi Blake, a recent lecturer at our last Conference, and the second was Catherine Horwood’s biography of Beth Chatto and her life with plants.  This proved the more tempting and having just had a win on the premium bonds (£25!) I treated myself via e-bay.

It is an extremely comprehensive coverage of Beth’s life, telling of her  childhood love of gardening, her education, early marriage to Andrew Chatto and later the many and varied personalities in the world of horticulture who became her friends.   I was particularly interested in Beth’s friendship with Cedric Morris and, later, her association with Christopher Lloyd.

I first learned about Beth Chatto and her nursery through flower arranging classes in the 1970s and by the early 80s decided it was time to take a trip down to Colchester.  Along with three flower arranging/gardening friends the visit was arranged and we decided to call at Bressingham Gardens, then in its heyday, to break our journey.  After a night spent in Diss we progressed on to Colchester and Elmstead Market and after a picnic in the car park (now the gravel garden) we toured Beth’s beautiful garden before progressing into the nursery area (bliss). 

Picnic in the car park – now the Gravel Garden
The Gravel Garden as it is today

  In her book Catherine tells of Mrs Desmond Underwood’s great friendship with Beth.  I do know we visited Mrs Underwood’s nursery, where she specialized in silver plants, but I did not realise she had such a great influence in starting the nursery.

After a night spent in Colchester we set out for home.  My Austin Metro was crammed full: four ladies and over 60 plants.   It was a long hard drive, but well worth the effort.

Laden car

I am reading this delightful book slowly – something to look forward to each day, it could not have come at a better time.

Judith Ladley

Publication details

Beth Chatto: a life with plants

by Catherine Horwood

Hardcover: 288 pages

Publisher: Pimpernel Press Ltd; (5 Sept. 2019)

ISBN-10: 1910258822

Kathy’s Quiz: no 4

Every week during the Lockdown, W Yorks HPS member Kathy Howard will produce a horticultural quiz to keep our minds fresh. The answers (no cheating please!) will be published alongside the following week’s quiz questions.

For answers to Quiz three, click here

This week we have anagrams.

These are all plants that may be in flower in your garden in April. Unscramble these words

1. Briers be

2. Rue phobia

3. Gain loam

4. Oh mania

5. Name one

6. Begin ear

7. Inch meal era 

8. Arum lip

9. Climes at

10. Rod horded non

Kathy’s Quiz: no 3 – Answers

Quiz week three

Name the year

1. Chelsea Flower Show temporarily lifts its ban on garden gnomes.   

2013

2. The Eden Project’s full site opens to the public

2001

3. Certain single tulip bulbs sell for more than ten times the annual income of a skilled craftworker.

1637

4. First series of ‘Gardeners World’ is broadcast from Oxford Botanical Gardens

1968

5. The Royal Botanical Gardens at Kew first opens its doors to the public

1840

6. Beth Chatto’s  ‘A life with plants’ is published. 

2019

7. Britain sees the number of allotments double to 1,400,000.

1943

8. The ‘Hardy Plant Society’ is formed

1957

9. Capability Brown, son of a land agent and a chambermaid, is born.

1716

10. Thompson and Morgan purchase the world’s first black hyacinth ‘Midnight Mystique’ bulb for £50,000 

1998

Lockdown Gallery – week 5

April 20 to April 26

Weather: Still dry – very much the theme of April 2020, with bright blue skies tempered by an easterly wind

Judith Ladley starts off week 5

Another Judith – this is Judith Edmond’s first time in the Lockdown Gallery – welcome!

Sue Gray makes a welcome return, including some plants from David Barnes’ garden

Terry Benton is back with some more bee flowers

Carine Carson has a very classy pear tree, with an even classier name

Prunus Padua ‘Le Thoureil’ – the label says ‘the small white flowers are followed by small black fruits sometimes in summer with ‘fabulous’ autumn clout in shades of red, orange and gold.’ So that is why I bought it – small garden and several seasons of interest

Remember Nette Bricker-Barrett from Massachusetts complaining that her garden is so brown, compared to ours? Well it isn’t brown anymore, but…

Not brown anymore! Snow in Massachusetts

Your editor, Brian Hackett, has also been trying his hand at a lasagne tulip bowl. Also, some lovely acid greens and the first flower of the water hawthorn

John and Joyce Kenny present this lovely Erythronium ‘Joanna’, as featured in April’s Plant of the Month.

Erythronium ‘Joanna’

Another excellent and varied selection from Diane Rawnsley, with a mystery plant at the end. My guess is Lunaria rediviva, the perennial honesty – let us know your thoughts!

Here’s an interesting idea from Pat Hunter – all the different Peonies in her garden, taken on the same day, showing their great variety

Kathy’s Quiz: no 3

Every week during the Lockdown, W Yorks HPS member Kathy Howard will produce a horticultural quiz to keep our minds fresh. The answers (no cheating please!) will be attached to the following week’s quiz questions.

For answers to quiz two, click here

This week’s quiz is a match the event to the year!

Choose the correct date from this list for each event

  1. 1637
  2. 1716
  3. 1840
  4. 1943
  5. 1957
  6. 1968
  7. 1998
  8. 2001
  9. 2013
  10. 2019

1. Chelsea Flower Show temporarily lifts its ban on garden gnomes.

2. The Eden Project’s full site opens to the public

3. Certain single tulip bulbs sell for more than ten times the annual income of a skilled craftworker.

4. First series of ‘Gardeners World’ is broadcast from Oxford Botanical Gardens

5. The Royal Botanical Gardens at Kew first opens its doors to the public

6. Beth Chatto’s  ‘A life with plants‘ is published

7. Britain sees the number of allotments double to 1,400,000

8. The ‘Hardy Plant Society’ is formed

9. Capability Brown, son of a land agent and a chambermaid, is born

10. Thompson and Morgan purchase the world’s first black hyacinth ‘Midnight Mystique’ bulb for £50,000

Kathy’s Quiz: no 2 – Answers

Quiz week two

What do these sets of four have in common?

1. Dorothy Perkins, Elizabeth Taylor, Leonardo Da Vinci, Lord Byron

All had roses named after them / varieties of roses

2. Sir Nicholas Bacon, Thomas Andrew Knight, Elizabeth Banks, Sir Simon Hornby

Past and present presidents of RHS

3. ‘Percy Thrower, Arthur Billitt, Geoff Hamilton, Alan Titchmarsh

Lead presenters of Gardeners’ World

4. Kim Wilde, Jonathan Price, Gordon Sumner (sting), George Harrison

Musicians turned gardeners

5. Pierre- Joseph Redoute, Raymond Booth, Anne Pratt, Marianne North

Botanical artists

6. Mrs Bradshaw, Lady Stratheden, Emory Quinn, Stevie Nicks

Varieties of Geum

7. John Rowland, Groundskeeper Willie, Mr McGregor, Samwise Gamgee

Fictional gardeners

8. Kate Moss, Mavis Simpson, Alan Mayes, Ann Folkard

Varieties of Geranium

9. King William, Aeolus, Arethusa, Bellona 

Temples in Kew Gardens

10. Estella Rijnveld, Prinses Irene, Irene Parrot, Jan Reus 

Varieties of tulip

Lockdown Gallery – week 4

April 13 to April 19

Weather: This week starts with Easter Monday, but the weather switches back to a cold northerly.

Diane Rawnsley has some varied environments in her garden and they are all delivering fine plants

Next is a view from the Kenny’s garden – Woodroyd and some impressive plants

Ann Fritchley has a handsome visitor in her garden, besides some very lovely plants

Terry Benton is keen to grow flowers to attract bumble bees

Maggie Sugden is next, with some early clematis, among others

Ann Lowe is joining the Lockdowners, with her first contributions:

And here’s Maggie Youdan’s latest:

Preston Harrison shows how his garden has come on since week one: